My Response to the BURKINI BAN!

Many innocent civilians in Europe and beyond have lost their lives tragically to the rising trend of extremism in the name of my faith. Time and time again, some of these terrorists have been let off the radar and given free reign to carry out their twisted agenda. And burkini-blur.jpgFrance’s response? Ban the burkini. Well, anything that doesn’t respect ‘good customs and secularism’, which is clearly open to interpretation, as seen recently with woman who are simply wearing a headscarf with leggings and a top FINED, something I’d wear myself – not because I’m being forced or ‘oppressed’, but because I simply don’t feel comfortable to show my body on the beach – why is that such a problem? Is it really necessary for the state to dictate one’s choice of clothing at a beach, or an armed male police officer to ask a woman to reduce her clothing at a beach? I find it hard to believe that they are in any way ‘threatening’, but rather an easy way to cause misconception, as if there isn’t enough already.

Argument one: They are extreme, and can be used to conceal weapons by terrorists.

Well first of all, good luck finding a terrorist wearing what is pretty much a wet suit, when they are in fact ALSO shamed by extremist organisations as inappropriate, let alone even being okay with woman on a beach. Also, it’s ironic that they were designed to allow Muslim woman, or in fact any woman who chooses not to wear a bikini on the beach more freedom to swim/play/chill on the beach without feeling uncomfortable. If terrorists want to harm others, then a burkini ban will not stop them and not only will rather empower their already twisted motives but needlessly deter and isolate perfectly moderate woman the chance to use the beaches. Politics has already poisoned faith, why is it being bought to beaches as well?

Argument two: “It is the expression of a political project, a counter-society, based notably on the enslavement of women.”, according to Manuel Valls, the French PM.

So exposing your body, according to the PM is the ONLY way to not be enslaved?  If the problem is with the burkini, which is merely a choice of swimwear, just like the bikini, then why are woman in full clothing also being fined? What is clearly misunderstood is the idea that the burkini is oppressive when it is actually revolutionary, as for the first time, practicing Muslim woman can have the same sense of freedom and enjoyment on the beach. If anything, it is the very opposite of enslavement. It is certainly far more daring than the restrictions on woman’s swimwear enforced by police not too long ago in Europe. It is also banned and frowned upon in many Muslim societies, such as in Iran. Why? Because it is seen as too REVEALING!

Argument three: ‘It is our laws which should be respected as I couldn’t wear this in (insert conservative Muslim society here)’

This argument always makes me cringe the most. First of all, yes, in many conservative societies you won’t really attract foreigners in the first place, but in top tourist destinations you are generally free to wear a bikini on the beach. But secondly, often those countries have very conservative cultural norms and human rights issues, and don’t often boast: Freedom, equality and fraternity. And most importantly, the woman wearing these on French soil are fully French citizens that may happen to be Muslim so why associate them with countries they have no association with?  A country claiming to be based on secular principles and freedom should surely disassociate from societies of such? If not, then what difference is there in obligatory clothing in Iran (the wearing of the headscarf) and the removal of clothing in France?

Once again, we have huge issues in the world, particularly with the rise of global terrorism and mass violation of human rights…. and law enforcement are being wasted to tell a woman she cannot cover her body on the beach.

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Bushra x

Twitter: @BushraSpeaks

Email: bushrajalilofficial@hotmail.co.uk

 

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